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Wednesday Hero ~

Author: yankeemom  //  Category: Wednesday Hero

SP4 Donald Ward Evans, Jr.

SP4 Donald Ward Evans, Jr.
23 years old from Covina, California
Company A, 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division
January 27, 1967

U.S. Army

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to Specialist Fourth Class Donald Ward Evans, Jr. (ASN: 56413728), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division, in action against enemy aggressor forces at Tri Tam, Republic of Vietnam, on 27 January 1967. Specialist Fourth Class Evans left his position of relative safety with his platoon which had not yet been committed to the battle to answer the calls for medical aid from the wounded men of another platoon which was heavily engaged with the enemy force. Dashing across 100 meters of open area through a withering hail of enemy fire and exploding grenades, he administered lifesaving treatment to one individual and continued to expose himself to the deadly enemy fire as he moved to treat each of the other wounded men and to offer them encouragement. Realizing that the wounds of one man required immediate attention, Specialist Fourth Class Evans dragged the injured soldier back across the dangerous fire-swept area, to a secure position from which he could be further evacuated. Miraculously escaping the enemy fusillade, Specialist Fourth Class Evans returned to the forward location. As he continued the treatment of the wounded, he was struck by fragments from an enemy grenade. Despite his serious and painful injury he succeeded in evacuating another wounded comrade, rejoined his platoon as it was committed to battle and was soon treating other wounded soldiers. As he evacuated another wounded man across the fire covered field, he was severely wounded. Continuing to refuse medical attention and ignoring advice to remain behind, he managed with his waning strength to move yet another wounded comrade across the dangerous open area to safety. Disregarding his painful wounds and seriously weakened from profuse bleeding, he continued his lifesaving medical aid and was killed while treating another wounded comrade. Specialist Fourth Class Evan’s extraordinary valor, dedication and indomitable spirit saved the lives of several of his fellow soldiers, served as an inspiration to the men of his company, were instrumental in the success of their mission, and reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of his country.


These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.


Those Who Say That We’re In A Time When There Are No Heroes,

They Just Don’t Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Wednesday Hero ~

Author: yankeemom  //  Category: Wednesday Hero

This Weeks Post Was Suggested By Cindy

SSgt. Jason Rogers

SSgt. Jason Rogers
28 years old from Brandon Mississippi
2nd Combat Engineer Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force
April 7, 2011

U.S. Marines

“The loss of Jason Rogers is going to make this world an emptier and lonelier and colder place,” said childhood friend Brandon Winfield. “I could write a War and Peace-sized story of the kind of person he was. Some people have it — the room just seemed to be dizzier and brighter with him in it.”

SSgt. Rogers was KIA on April 7 by an IED while on patrol with his unit in the Helmond Province of Afghanistan.

“He was doing something voluntarily that he loved to do, and he felt like he was making a difference and doing something that made other people proud,” said friend Derrick Brownlee.

You can read more about SSgt. Rogers here.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Wednesday Hero ~

Author: yankeemom  //  Category: Wednesday Hero

This Weeks Post Was Suggested By Kathi

SSgt. James I. Spurrier, Jr.

SSgt. James I. Spurrier, Jr. (Left)
61 years old from Tennessee
134th Infantry Regiment, 35th Infantry Division
December 14, 1922 – February 25, 1984

U.S. Army

SSgt. James I. Spurrier, Jr., aka Junior J. Spurrier, distinguished himself multiple times during WWII. One of which, almost single handedly capturing the village of Achain, France, won him the Medal Of Honor. But after the war, SSg. Spurrier had a tough time. Trouble with alcohol and run ins with the law.   All due to PTSD.

You can read more about SSg. Spurrier here and here. And if you, or someone you know, is suffering with PTSD there is help.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Wednesday Hero ~

Author: yankeemom  //  Category: Wednesday Hero

Sgt. Jorge A. Diaz

Sgt. Jorge A. Diaz

U.S. Marines

Sgt. Jorge A. Diaz, a squad leader with Kilo Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, receives a Bronze Star Medal with Combat V from Lt. Gen. Kenneth J. Glueck, Jr., commanding general, III Marine Expeditionary Force, during Glueck’s visit to Marine Corps Base Hawaii with Sgt. Maj. Daniel J. Fierle, III MEF sergeant major, April 28, 2011. Diaz received the award for heroic achievement in connection with combat operations against the enemy during Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan, Sept. 17, 2010.

Photo Courtesy Of Marines.mil

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Wednesday Hero ~

Author: yankeemom  //  Category: Wednesday Hero

This Weeks Post Was Suggested by Michael

Col. Robert L. Howard

Col. Robert L. Howard
70 years old from Waco, Texas
Army Special Forces MACV-SOG Special Operations Command Korea
July 11, 1939 – December 23, 2009

U.S. Army

You learn very quickly that Col. Robert Howard was an amazing man. Wounded 14 times in 54 months of combat. 8 Purple Hearts, 4 Bronze Stars, 2 Distinguished Service Crosses. And the awards go on from there. But it’s the three Medal Of Honor nominations for three separate actions within a thirteen month period that stand out.


1st Lt. Robert Howard Receives The Medal Of Honor

You can read more about Col. Robert L. Howard here and here and a tribute page dedicated to him here.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Wednesday Hero ~

Author: yankeemom  //  Category: Wednesday Hero

Capt. Lawrence Rollo

Capt. Lawrence Rollo

U.S. Navy

Capt. Lawrence Rollo cradles a Nigerian baby while visiting with locals during a community relations project at the Light of Dawn Government Junior Secondary School Tomarow as part of Africa Partnership Station (APS) West. APS is an international security cooperation initiative designed to strengthen global maritime partnerships through training and collaborative activities to improve maritime safety and security in Africa.

Information And Photo Courtesy U.S. Navy. Taken by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Darryl Wood

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Wednesday Hero ~

Author: yankeemom  //  Category: Wednesday Hero

This Weeks Post Was Suggested By Steve

Lt. Col. Charles L. Brown

Lt. Col. Charles L. Brown
86 years old from Miami, Florida
October 24, 1922 – November 24, 2008

U.S. Air Force

For extraordinary heroism in military operations in WWII he was awarded the Air Force Cross our nations award for valor second only to the Medal of Honor. He flew 29 combat missions as a B-17 pilot. His many other military decorations included the Purple Heart for wounds received in combat. Upon being offered a position with the United States Department of State he took early retirement from the Air Force and continued to serve his nation as a senior Foreign Service Officer spending six years in Southeast Asia as Inspector-In- Charge, Agency for International Development, U.S. Dept. of State

Sadly couldn’t find too much information on Lt. Col. Brown. The best source was his obituary.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Wednesday Hero ~

Author: yankeemom  //  Category: Wednesday Hero

This Weeks Post Was Suggested By Cindy

Marven Hume

Marvin Hume
89 years old
Cape May, New Jersey


U.S. Flag

89-year-old Marvin Hume loves his country and the Man and Woman who fight for it. Every evening, between Memorial Day and mid-October, for the last 38 years Mr. Hume, a Navy vet himself, has held a ceremony in New Jersey where he raises a flag that has been draped over a the casket of a veteran.

You can read the rest of the story here.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.


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Wednesday Hero ~

Author: yankeemom  //  Category: Wednesday Hero

This Weeks Post Was Inspired By Sgt. Epler

Sgt. Ed Eaton

Sgt. Ed Eaton
From Tillamook, Oregon

U.S. Marines

While many view snipers as the hidden (safe) threats in war based on their forays in First Person Shooter video games and movies like Saving Private Ryan and Enemy at The Gates, the fact of the matter is that snipers like any other soldiers in war are very susceptible to danger – especially in the case of Sergeant Ed Eaton’s brave protection and rescue of comrade in arms Major Mike Perkins when he had fallen injured in a night assault during the Vietnam war 1969

You can read more about Sgt. Eaton here. A quick caveat though. In doing research for this post this is the best site I could find for information on Sgt. Eaton. It’s not a site that I would normally link to for Wednesday Hero, but, like I said, it has the best information. There’s nothing really bad on it, but it may have some posts that some may not like.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Wednesday Hero ~

Author: yankeemom  //  Category: Wednesday Hero

This Weeks Post Was Suggested By Michael

Cpl. Frank Woodruff Buckles

Cpl. Frank Woodruff Buckles
110 years old from Charles Town, West Virginia
1st Fort Riley Casual Detachment
February 1, 1901 – February 27, 2011

U.S. Army

On February 27, Frank Woodruff Buckles, America’s last surviving WWI veteran, passed away at the age of 110. During The Great War he served as an ambulance driver. In 1920 he was discharged from the Army. In 1942, while working for the White Star and W.R. Grace shipping companies, he was captured by the Japanese and spent three years in the Los Baños prison camp. He became malnourished and dropped down to to below 100 pounds.

You can read the rest of Cpl. Buckles story here and here.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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