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2012 POW/MIA Recognition Day ~

Author: yankeemom  //  Category: POW/MIA

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POW/MIA Recognition Day Honors Service Members

09/19/2012 05:39 PM CDT

National POW/MIA Recognition Day is Friday, Sept. 21.  Each year, the President issues a proclamation asking Americans to recognize the nation’s service members who were held prisoner or are still missing, and their families.

The day’s events include a Pentagon commemoration ceremony hosting former prisoners of war, family members, military service members and distinguished guests.  Traditionally held on the third Friday in September, the event will include formal military honors.  A flyover of military aircraft is scheduled to conclude the ceremony.

Also, in New York City, Department of Defense (DoD) representatives will participate in the New York Stock Exchange’s Closing Bell Ceremony to honor prisoners of war and those missing in action.  The New York Yankees will acknowledge the day with a home plate tribute to service members, past and present, during a game that evening.

In addition, observances of National POW/MIA Recognition Day are held across the country on military installations, at state capitols, in local communities, schools and at various veterans’ facilities.

As a result of resolutions passed in Congress, the first official commemoration of POW/MIAs was in 1979, when the first national ceremony was held.  The observance is one of six days of the year that Congress has mandated flying of the POW/MIA flag, created by the National League of Families’, at major military installations, national cemeteries, all post offices, VA medical facilities, the World War II Memorial, Korean War Veterans Memorial, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, the offices of the secretaries of state, defense and veterans affairs, the director of the selective service system and the White House.

The DoD has more than 600 people dedicated to the worldwide mission of accounting for the more than 83,000missing service members from conflicts as far back as World War II.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO website at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1169.

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2012 POW MIA Remembrance Table Ceremony

Published on May 28, 2012 by 

You may notice this small table here in a place of honor. It is set for one.
Those who have served and those currently serving the uniformed services of the United States are ever mindful that the price of enduring peace and freedom comes at the highest prices of personal sacrifice.
This table symbolizes our fallen and missing comrades. They are commonly called P.O.W.’s or M.I.A.’s, we call them brothers.
They are unable to be with us this evening and so we remember them.
This table set for one is small… it symbolizes the frailty of one prisoner against his oppressors.
The table cloth is white… it symbolizes the purity of their intentions to respond to their country’s call to arms.
The single red rose signifies the blood many have shed in sacrifice to ensure the freedom of the United States of America.
The yellow ribbon represents all those who demand a proper accounting of our missing comrades.
A slice of lemon is on the bread plate… to remind us of their bitter fate.
There is salt upon the bread plate… symbolic of the family’s tears as they wait.
The glass is inverted… they cannot toast with us tonight.
The chair is empty… they are not here.
The candle is the light of hope that lives in our hearts to illuminate their way home, away from their captors, to the open arms of a grateful nation.
Remember… all of you who served with them and called them comrades, who depended on their might and aid, and relied on them… for surely… they have not forsaken you.
You are not forgotten as long as there is one left in whom your memory remains!

  • Lt. Col. Clarence F. Blanton, U.S. Air Force, was lost on March 11, 1968, in Houaphan Province, Laos, when his unit was overrun by enemy forces. He was accounted for on July 26, 2012.
  • Cpl. Francis J. Reimer, U.S. Army, M Company, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 31stRegimental Combat Team, was lost on Dec. 12, 1950, near the Chosin Reservoir. He was accounted for on July 19, 2012.
  • Cpl. Clarence H. Huff, Jr., U.S. Marine Corps, I Company, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1stMarine Division was lost on Dec. 2, 1950, near the Chosin Reservoir. He was accounted for on July 13, 2012.
  • PFC Richard S. Gzik, U.S. Marine Corps, M Battery, 11th Artillery Regiment, 1st Marine Division, was lost on Dec. 2 1950, near the Chosin Reservoir. He was accounted for on July 11, 2012.
  • PFC Richard W. Rivenburgh and PFC James R. Maxwell, U.S. Marine Corps, were lost on May 15, 1975, near Koh Tang Island, Cambodia. They were accounted for on June 25, and July 9, respectively.
  • Sgt. William T. Barker, U.S. Army, 503rd Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, was lost in February 1951, while in captivity in Pyokdong, North Korea. He was accounted for on June 30, 2012.
  • Sgt. Thomas J. Barksdale, B Battery, 503rd Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, was lost on Nov. 30, 1950, near Ch’ongch’on, North Korea. He was accounted for on June 22, 2012.
  • Sgt. 1st Class William T. BrownSgt. 1st Class Donald M. Shue and Sgt. 1st Class Gunther H. Wald , U.S. Army, 5th Special Forces Group, were lost on Nov. 3, 1969, in Quang Tri Province, Vietnam. They were accounted for on May 19, 2011, March 18, 2011, and May 30, 2012, respectively.
  • Cpl. Pryor Gobble, U.S. Army, L Company, 3rd Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, was lost on Dec. 11, 1950, near Hagaru-ri, North Korea. He was accounted for on May 23, 2012.
  • 1st Lt. Warren G. Moxley, U.S. Army Air Forces, 107th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, 67thTactical Reconnaissance Group, 9th Air Force, was lost on March 15, 1945, near Neustadt, Germany. He was accounted for on May 22, 2012.
  • Cpl. Kenneth R. Block, U.S. Army, M Company, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 31stRegimental Combat Team, was lost on Dec. 3, 1950, near the Chosin Reservoir, in North Korea. He was accounted for on May 18, 2012.
  • Radioman 1st Class Harry C. Scribner, U.S. Navy was lost on Aug. 22, 1943, when the TBF-1 Avenger aircraft on which he was a crewmember crashed on the island of Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides (Vanuatu). He was accounted for on May 4, 2012.
  • 1st Lt. Laverne A. Lallathin, 2nd Lt. Dwight D. Ekstam, 2nd Lt. Walter B. Vincent, Jr., Tech. Sgt. James A. SisneyCpl. Wayne R. Erickson, Cpl. John D. Yeager, and Pfc. John A. Donovan, U.S. Marine Corps, were lost on April 22, 1944, when their PBJ-1 crashed over the island of Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides (Vanuatu). They were identified on Jan. 24, 2012. They were accounted for on May 7, March 28, March 6, May 9, March 7, March 14, March 16, respectively.
  • Pfc. Gerald W. Kight,U.S. Army, 82nd Division, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, was lost on Sept. 28, 1944, near Groesbeek, Netherlands. He was accounted for on April 19, 2012.
  • Cpl. David L. Catlin,U.S. Army, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 31st Regimental Combat Team, was lost on Dec. 2, 1950, near the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea. He was accounted for on April 16, 2012.
  • Cpl. Clyde E. Anderson, U.S. Army, Medical Company, 31st Infantry Regiment, assigned to the 31st Regimental Combat Team, was lost on Nov. 28, 1950, near Kaljon-ri, North Korea. He was accounted for on April 13, 2012.
  • Capt. Virgil K. Meroney III, U.S. Air Force, was lost on March 1, 1969, when the F-4D Phantom II that he was piloting was shot down in Khammouan Province, Laos. He was accounted for on April 11, 2012.
  • Col. Joseph ChristianoCol. Derrell B. JeffordsLt. Col. Dennis L. EilersChief Master Sgt. William K. ColwellChief Master Sgt. Arden K. Hassenger, and Chief Master Sgt. Larry C. Thornton, U.S. Air Force, were lost on Dec. 24, 1965, when their AC-47D gunship crashed in Savannakhet Province, Laos. They were identified on March 5, 2012. They were accounted for on April 5, April 7, April 6, March 29, March 22, and April 10, respectively.
  • Lt. Dennis W. Peterson,U.S. Navy, was lost on July 19, 1967, when the SH-3A Sea King helicopter that he was piloting was shot down in Ha Nam Province, Vietnam. He was accounted for on March 30, 2012.
  • Pfc. Nelson E. Young, U.S. Army, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 31st Regimental Combat Team, was captured on Dec. 2, 1950, near the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea and died in late 1950 or early 1951. He was accounted for on March 30, 2012.
  • Master Sgt. Elwood Green, U.S. Army, E Company, 2nd Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1stCavalry Division was captured on Nov. 28, 1950, and died in 1951 in a POW Camp in North Korea. He was accounted for on Mar. 1, 2012.
  • Sgt. 1st Class Richard L. Harris, U.S. Army, L Company, 3rd Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2ndInfantry Division was captured on Nov. 30, 1950 and died in Jan. 1951 in a POW Camp in North Korea. He was accounted for on Feb. 29, 2012.
  • 2nd Lt. Charles R. Moritz, U.S. Army Air Forces, of the 496th Fighter Training Group was lost on June 7, 1944, when his P-51 C Mustang crashed near Goxhill airfield, England. He was accounted for on Feb. 26, 2012.
  • Staff Sgt. Ahmed K. al-Taie, U.S. Army, was lost on Oct. 23, 2006, while serving in Iraq as a translator for the U.S. military. He was accounted for on Feb. 25, 2012.
  • Lt. Col. Robert M. Brown,U.S. Air Force, 6280th Combat Support Group, was lost on Nov. 7, 1972, near Quang Binh Province, North Vietnam. He was accounted for on Feb. 25, 2012 .
  • Cpl. Robert I. Wax, U.S. Army, of Battery A, 555th Field Artillery Battalion, was lost on Aug. 11, 1950, near Pongam-ni, South Korea. He was accounted for on Feb. 23, 2012 .
  • Cpl. James N. Larkin, U.S. Army, C Company, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, was captured on Feb. 11, 1951, and died in captivity in April 1951. He was accounted for on Feb. 21, 2012.
  • Cpl. Henry F. Johnson, U.S. Army, L Company, 3rd Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment was captured on Nov. 25 1950, and died in captivity in 1951. He was accounted for on Feb. 15, 2012.
  • Lt. William E. Swanson,U.S. Navy, carrier USS Ranger, was lost April 11, 1965, when his A-1H aircraft crashed near Khammouan Province, Laos. He was accounted for on Feb. 14, 2012.
  • 2nd Lt. Emil T. Wasilewski, U.S. Army Air Forces, was lost when his B-17G was shot down on Sept. 13, 1944, during a bombing mission over Merseburg, Germany. He was accounted for on Feb. 11, 2012.
  • Pvt. Arthur W. Leiviska, U.S. Army, L Company, 3rd Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, who was captured in 1951 and died in captivity on April 20, 1951. He was accounted for on Feb. 3, 2012.
  • Cpl. Dick E. Osborne, U.S. Army, L Company, 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, was lost on Nov. 2, 1950, near Unsan, North Korea. He was accounted for on Jan. 27, 2012.
  • Pfc. Frank P. Jennings, U.S. Army, E Company, 2nd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment was lost near Jeon-Gog, South Korea on April 25, 1951. He was accounted for on Jan. 18, 2012.
  • Sgt. 1st Class Edris A. Viers, U.S. Army, Battery A, 555th Field Artillery Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, was lost near Pongam-ni, South Korea on Aug. 12, 1950. He was accounted for on Jan. 17, 2012.
  • Cpl. William R. Sluss, U.S. Army, Service Battery, 38th Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, was captured by enemy forces in late Nov. 1950, near Kunu-ri, North Korea, and died at POW Camp 5 in April 1951. He was accounted for on Jan. 17, 2012.
  • Cpl. Chester J. Roper, U.S. Army, Battery A, 503rd Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, was captured by enemy forces on Dec. 1, 1950, near Somindong, North Korea, and died in early 1951 in POW Camp 5 at Pyoktong. He was accounted for on Jan. 4, 2012.

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Sgt Bowe Bergdahl, US Army, was captured in Afghanistan on 30 June 2009 by members of the Haqqani network, a Taliban allied insurgent group. He is currently being held as a prisoner of war.


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WWII MIA Returns Home ~

Author: yankeemom  //  Category: POW/MIA

Soldier Missing in Action from WWII Identified

The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a serviceman, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Pfc. Robert B. Bayne, of Dundalk, Md., will be buried on May 7 in his hometown. On March 28, 1945, while patrolling the Rhine River in an inflatable raft, Bayne, a lieutenant and two other enlisted men were attacked near Schwegenheim, Germany. Bayne and the officer were wounded, forcing all four men into the swift waters of the river. The lieutenant was rescued but the enlisted men were not found.

Between 1945 and 1946, Army Graves Registration personnel exhumed remains of three men from two different locations when German citizens reported the graves contained remains of American soldiers recovered from the river in March 1945. Among items found with the remains were military identification tags. Two of the men were identified as enlisted men from the raft — Pvt. Edward Kulback and Pfc. William Gaffney — but due to limited forensic science of the time, the remains of the other individual could not be identified and were interred at the U.S. Military Cemetery in St. Avold, France as “unknown.”

In 1948, the remains of the unknown soldier were exhumed to compare them to available records for Bayne. After several years of analysis the remains could not be identified and were reinterred as unknown at the Rhone American Cemetery and Memorial in Draguignan, France, in 1951.

More than 60 years later, analysts from DPMO and the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) developed case leads, evaluated records and determined that modern forensic technology could offer methods to identify the remains. In 2010, the remains were exhumed once again for analysis.

Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from JPAC used dental comparisons and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA — which matched that of Bayne’s brothers — in the identification of his remains.

At the end of the war, the U.S. government was unable to recover and identify approximately 79,000 Americans. Today, more than 74,000 are unaccounted-for from the conflict.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO website at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1169.

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~ Welcome Home, Pfc Bayne ~

A long road traveled – rest easy now.

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Korean War Soldier Returns Home ~

Author: yankeemom  //  Category: POW/MIA

U.S. Soldier MIA from Korean War Identified

The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office announced today that the remains of a serviceman, missing in action from the Korean War, have been identified and are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Cpl. Primo C. Carnabuci of Old Saybrook, Conn., will be buried May 12 in his hometown. On Nov. 1, 1950, Carnabuci’s unit, the 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, occupied a defensive position along the Kuryong River, near Unsan, North Korea. Chinese units attacked the area and forced a withdrawal. Almost 600 men, including Carnabuci, were reported missing or killed in action following the battle.

In 2000, a joint U.S-Democratic People’s Republic of Korea team, led by the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC), excavated a mass grave discovered earlier in Unsan County, south of the area known as “Camel’s Head.” The team recovered remains of at least five individuals as well as military clothing.

Analysts from DPMO and JPAC developed case leads with information spanning more than 58 years. They evaluated the circumstances surrounding the soldier’s death and researched wartime documentation on the movements of U.S. and enemy forces on the battlefield.

Among forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from JPAC used dental comparisons and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA — which matched that of Carnabuci’s brother — in the identification.

With this identification, 7,997 service members still remain missing from the conflict.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO website at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1420.

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~ Welcome Home, Cpl Carnabuci ~

You are not forgotten.

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Another Korean War Soldier Comes Home ~

Author: yankeemom  //  Category: POW/MIA

Soldier Missing from Korean War Identified Soldier Missing from Korean War Identified

April 12, 2011

The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a serviceman, missing in action from the Korean War, have been identified and returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Cpl. John W. Lutz, 21, of Kearny, N.J., will be buried tomorrow at Arlington National Cemetery. From May 16-20, 1951, Task Force Zebra, a multinational force made up of Dutch, French, and U.S. forces, was attacked and isolated into smaller units. Lutz, of the 1st Ranger Infantry Company, part of Task Force Zebra, went missing while his unit was attempting to infiltrate enemy lines near Chaun-ni, South Korea, along the Hongcheon River Valley.

After the 1953 armistice, surviving POWs said Lutz had been captured by enemy forces on May 19, marched north to a POW camp in Suan County, North Korea, and died of malnutrition in July 1951.

Between 1991-94, North Korea gave the United States 208 boxes of remains believed to contain the remains of 200-400 servicemen. North Korean documents turned over with one of the boxes indicated the remains inside were exhumed near Suan County. This location correlates with the corporal’s last known location.

Analysts from DPMO developed case leads with information spanning more than 58 years. Through interviews with surviving POW eyewitnesses, experts validated circumstances surrounding the soldier’s captivity and death, confirming wartime documentation of his loss.

Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory also used dental comparisons and mitochondrial DNA – which matched that of his niecein the identification of the remains.

More than 2,000 servicemen died as prisoners of war during the Korean War. With this accounting, 8,001 service members still remain missing from the conflict. For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO web site at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703- 699-1169.

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~ Welcome Home, Soldier ~

Rest Easy Now in the Company of your Brothers

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Airmen Missing From Vietnam War Identified

Author: yankeemom  //  Category: POW/MIA

Airmen Missing From Vietnam War Identified

The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of two servicemen, missing in action from the Vietnam War, have been identified and returned to their families for burial with full military honors.

Air Force Col. James E. Dennany, 34, of Kalamazoo, Mich., and Maj. Robert L. Tucci, 27, of Detroit, will be buried as a group Jan. 14, in the Dallas-Ft. Worth National Cemetery.

On Nov. 12, 1969, Dennany and Tucci were flying the number three aircraft of three F-4Ds escorting an AC-130 gunship on a night strike mission over Laos. After the gunship attacked six trucks and set two of them on fire, the AC-130 crew’s night vision equipment was impacted by the glow from the fires. They requested that Tucci attack the remaining trucks. During the attack, gunship crew members observed anti-aircraft artillery gunfire directed at Tucci’s plane followed by a large explosion. No radio transmissions were heard from the F-4D following the attack and no parachutes were seen in the area. An immediate electronic search revealed nothing and no formal search was initiated due to heavy anti-aircraft fire in the area.

Beginning in the mid-1990s analysts at DPMO and the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) developed case leads they collected from wartime reporting and archival research.

In 1994, a joint U.S.-Lao People’s Democratic Republic (L.P.D.R.) team led by JPAC analyzed leads, interviewed villagers, and surveyed five reported crash sites near the record loss location with negative results.

In 1999, during another joint survey, officials in Ban Soppeng, Laos, turned over remains later determined to be human, two .38 caliber pistols and other crew-related equipment that villagers had recovered from a nearby crash site. Between 1999 and 2009, other joint U.S.-L.P.D.R. teams pursued leads, interviewed villagers, and conducted three excavations. They recovered aircraft wreckage, human remains, crew-related equipment and personal effects.

JPAC scientists used forensic tools and circumstantial evidence in the identification of the remains.

With the accounting of these airmen, 1,702 service members still remain missing from the conflict.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO website at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo/ or call 703-699-1169.

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Welcome home, Airmen Dennany and Tucci

Smooth flying ~ always

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As They Long Come Home ~

Author: yankeemom  //  Category: POW/MIA

Gates: Nation Will Bring Home Missing Troops

By Elaine Wilson
American Forces Press Service

WASHINGTON, Sept. 17, 2010 – Standing in front of rows of sharply dressed troops today, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates underscored the Defense Department‘s commitment to bringing every missing servicemember home.

“For our nation’s missing, we must close the gap,” the secretary said. “We must find the fallen. Your love for them will never die, and their country’s efforts to get them home will never cease.”

Gates joined a group of military and civilian leaders, veterans and families on the east side ofthe Pentagon for a National POW/MIA Recognition Day ceremony. A sea of family members and supporters filled several rows; their badges prominently displaying a missing or recovered loved one’s name.

The nation is sparing no effort to locate and identify the remains of those servicemembers who have not returned home, Gates said. Every day, he said, American service personnel and civilian experts around the world are working toward this end. These activities have intensified in scope and sophistication throughout the years, he added.

Since last year’s ceremony, Defense Department teams have accounted for 66 formerly missing Americans, Gates said, including 15 from the Vietnam War, 16 from the Korean War, 34 from World War II and one from World War I.

“This is slow and painstaking work,” he said. “We pursue it doggedly. The missing and their families deserve no less.”

Gates also underscored his commitment to today’s servicemembers, who he said are selflessly choosing to serve in a time of war.

“We must never grow complacent when it comes to protecting and accounting for our men and women on the front lines, given the nature of the conflicts we are in and the enemy we face, one not known for taking or keeping prisoners,” Gates said. “Our adversaries are on notice.”

Just as the United States is committed to upholding the laws of armed conflict and the nation’s laws and values in the treatment of prisoners, “so too will we hold them fully and completely responsible for how they deal with any U.S. troops that may come under their control,” Gates pledged.

And the nation, he added, will never cease its efforts to locate and bring these troops home if they fall into harm’s way.

“Our concern for their welfare is unremitting,” he said, “and if they are missing or captured, we will not rest until we find them, even as the conflicts recede into history.”

That same commitment extends to those missing from past wars, Gates noted. “This department‘s commitment to prisoners of war, the missing and their families is deep and abiding, a reflection of the incalculable debt that shall always be owed to them by the people of the United States of America,” he said.

While today is set aside for a formal tribute, Marine Corps Gen. James E. Cartwright, vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told the audience that the nation remembers missing loved ones all year, every year.

The nation has memorials, ships and buildings named after lost loved ones from past wars, Cartwright noted, and the Pentagon just dedicated a new corridor to U.S. prisoners of war and troops listed as missing in action. The hallway is lined with information, artifacts and photographs underscoring the service and sacrifice of more than 80,000 MIAs and POWs from the present conflict in Afghanistan and dating back to World War II.

But while these displays and memorials serve as powerful reminders and tributes, the general said, they don’t represent the complete legacy of those left behind.

“You, the families are the true legacy,” Cartwright said. “You are what they are most proud of. You are the living reminder of their sacrifice. You are their legacy.”

We must keep their feet to the fire on this.  We leave no one behind and we will never forget.

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Missing WWII Airman Identified

The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a serviceman, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Arthur F. Parkhurst, of Evansville, Ind., will be buried on Oct. 16 in Dayton, Ohio. On March 12, 1945, Parkhurst and five other crew members aboard a C-47A Skytrain departed Tanauan Airfield on Leyte, Philippines, on a resupply mission to guerilla troops. Once cleared for takeoff there was no further communication between the aircrew and airfield operators. When the aircraft failed to return, a thorough search of an area ten miles on either side of the intended route was initiated. No evidence of the aircraft was found and the six men were presumed killed in action, their remains determined non-recoverable.

In 1989, a Philippine national police officer contacted U.S. officials regarding a possible World War II-era aircraft crash near Leyte. Human remains, aircraft parts and artifacts — including an identification tag belonging to Parkhurst — were turned over to the local police, then to U.S. officials.

Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command used dental comparisons and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA — which matched that of Parkhurst’s brother and sister — in the identification of his remains.

At the end of the war, the U.S. government was unable to recover and identify approximately 79,000 Americans. Today, more than 72,000 are unaccounted-for from the conflict.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for missing Americans, call 703-699-1169 or visit the DPMO Web site at www.dtic.mil/dpmo .

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Missing Vietnam War Soldiers Identified

The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of three servicemen, missing in action from the Vietnam War, have been identified and will be returned to their families for burial with full military honors.

Army Staff Sgt. Robert S. Griffith, of Hapeville, Ga., will be buried on Oct. 23 in Fairburn, Ga. The group remains of the other two soldiers which could not be individually identified — Army Staff Sgt. Melvin C. Dye, of Carleton, Mich., and Sgt. 1st Class Douglas J. Glover, of Cortland, N.Y., will be buried at a later date. The men were aboard a UH-1H Iroquois helicopter on Feb. 19, 1968, when it was shot down by enemy fire in Laos. They were involved in an attempt to extract a long-range reconnaissance patrol in the mountains of Attapu Province. Three other American service members survived the crash and were rescued, but three Vietnamese Montagnards did not survive.

Several hours after the crash, a team was dispatched to survey the location and reported seeing remains of at least five people. Enemy activity prevented remains recovery at that time. The following month a second team was sent to the crash site but found no remains.

In 1995, a joint U.S.-Lao People’s Democratic Republic team traveled to the recorded grid coordinates for the crash site but found no evidence of a helicopter crash. The team then surveyed a second location in the area where they found helicopter wreckage and human remains. In 2006, a follow-on team was not able to resurvey the same site due to severe overgrowth and time constraints. Another team excavated the location in late 2007 recovering human remains, wreckage and military-related equipment.

Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command used dental x-rays in the identification of Griffith’s remains.

Since late 1973, the remains of 938 Americans killed in the Vietnam War have been accounted for and returned to their families with 1,708 service members still missing.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for missing Americans, call 703-699-1169 or visit the DPMO Web site at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo.

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Soldier Missing in Action from WWII Identified

The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Staff Sgt. John R. Simonetti, 26, of Jackson Heights, N.Y., will be buried on Oct. 25 in Arlington National Cemetery. Following the Normandy invasion, allied troops began the deadly task of engaging regrouped German forces in the pastures, hedgerows and villages of France. On June 16, 1944, Simonetti was among the advancing infantrymen of the 9th Infantry Regiment of the 2nd Infantry Division. The soldiers were met with heavy automatic weapons and mortar fire and were forced to stop and take cover before they reached the French town of St. Germain-d’Elle. During the battle, the Americans sustained heavy losses, including Simonetti. Two members of his unit later gave conflicting information on the location and disposition of his remains. In the first account, the witness stated his body could not be recovered due to enemy activity, and the second said his body was evacuated to the battalion aid station. Two post-war investigations failed to recover his remains and he was declared non-recoverable by a military review board in 1950.

In May 2009, a French construction crew uncovered human remains and military equipment-including Simonetti’s identifications tags-when excavating a site in St. Germain-d’Elle. French police turned over the remains and artifacts to U.S. officials for analysis.

Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command used dental comparisons in the identification of his remains.

At the end of the war, the U.S. government was unable to recover and identify approximately 79,000 Americans. Today, more than 74,000 are unaccounted-for from the conflict.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO Web site at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703- 699-1169.

~ Welcome Home ~

Rest easy now as you fight no more.

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We Have Finally Come Home ~

Author: yankeemom  //  Category: POW/MIA


The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that remains the of a U.S. serviceman, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

He is Sgt. John P. Bonnassiolle, U.S. Army, of Oakland, Calif.  He will be buried Tuesday in San Francisco.

On April 29, 1944, he was aboard a B-24J Liberator with nine other crewmen. They failed to return following a bombing mission over Berlin.  German documents captured after the war established the aircraft had crashed near the town of East Meitze, Germany, north of Hannover.  German forces removed the remains of three crewmen from the site and buried them in a cemetery in Hannover.

In 1946, The U.S. Army’s Graves Registration Command located the remains of the men buried in Hannover and reburied them at the U.S. Military Cemetery at Neuville-en-Condroz, Belgium, after confirming theof two of the three. identities

In 2003, a German citizen began excavating the East Meitze crash site and turned over human remains to U.S. officials.  A Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command team traveled to excavate the crash site in 2005 and 2007, recovering additional remains and crew-related equipment — including identification tags for Bonnassiolle and three other crew members.

Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from JPAC and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA — which matched that of Bonnassiolle’s sister — in the identification of his remains.

More than 400,000 of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II died.  At the end of the war, the U.S. government was unable to recover, identify and bury approximately 79,000 as known persons. Today, more than 72,000 Americans remain unaccounted-for from the conflict.

For additional information on the Defense Department‘s mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO Web site at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1169.

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The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

U.S. Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Ray F. Fletcher, of Westborough, Mass., will be buried Aug. 20 in Burlington, Vt.

On May 10, 1944, he and four others aboard a B-25C Mitchell bomber took off from Ajaccio, Corsica, on a routine courier mission to Ghisonaccia, Corsica. They failed to reach the destination and were officially reported missing on May 13, 1944.  Two days later, French police reported finding aircraft wreckage on the island’s Mount Cagna.

The U.S. Army’s Graves Registration Command visited the crash site in 1944 and reported remains were not recoverable.  It was not until May 1989 that Corsican authorities notified U.S. Army Memorial Affairs Activity-Europe that they had found wreckage of an American WWII-era aircraft and turned over human remains collected at the mountainous location.  They sent a survey team to the site and determined the terrain was too rugged to support a recovery effort.  In 2003 and 2004, two French nationals provided U.S. authorities with crew-related equipment recovered from the crash site.

A Joint Prisoners of War, Missing in Action Accounting Command (JPAC) team excavated the location in September 2005 and recovered additional human remains as well as more crew-related equipment.

Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from JPAC and thethe identification of Fletcher’s remains. Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA in

This month marks the 65th anniversary of the end of World War II.  More than 400,000 of the 16 million Americans who served during the war died.  At the end of the conflict, the U.S. government was unable to recover, identify and bury approximately 79,000 as known persons. Today, more than 72,000 World War II Americans remain unaccounted-for.

For additional information on the Defense Department‘s mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO Web site at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1420.

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Missing WWII Soldier is Identified

The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a serviceman, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Pfc. James C. Konyud, of Cleveland, will be buried on Sept. 25 in his hometown.  From mid-September 1944 to early February 1945, the Army was engaged against German forces in the Hürtgen Forest, along the Germany/Belgium border, in the longest continuously fought battle in American history.  In early January 1945, elements of the 121st Infantry Regiment, 8th Infantry Division were deployed defensively in the area southeast of Aachen.  Konyud, a member of K Company, 121st Infantry Regiment, was reported missing near the location on Jan. 1.

In 2007, a German explosive ordnance disposal team working in an agricultural field between Vossenack and Hürtgen, found human remains and military-related equipment, including Konyud’s military identification tag.  The remains and items were turned over to Army Memorial Affairs Activity-Europe officials for further analysis.

Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) teams traveled to excavate the site twice in 2007 and once in 2008, recovering additional remains and other military-related equipment, including a second identification tag for Konyud.

Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from JPAC and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA, which matched that of Konyud’s brother and niece, in the identification of his remains.

More than 400,000 of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II died.  At the end of the war, the U.S. government was unable to recover, identify and bury approximately 79,000 as known persons.  Today, more than 72,000 Americans remain unaccounted-for from the conflict.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for missing Americans, call 703-699-1420 or visit the DPMO Web site at www.dtic.mil/dpmo .

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Correction:  September 23, 2010 – The initial press release stated the remains were excavated from a crash site and that crew-related equipment was also recovered.  Pfc. Konyud died in a ground battle and his remains, along with military-related equipment, were recovered in a field and were not found at a crash site.

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The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office announced today that the remains of a serviceman, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Sgt. Edward T. Jones, of West Pawlet, Vt., will be buried on Sept. 25 in Saratoga, N.Y.  In November 1944, the 112th Infantry Regiment, 28th Infantry Division was traveling east through the Hürtgen Forest in an attempt to capture the German towns of Vossenack and Schmidt.  On Nov. 6, Jones and five other members of A Company, 112th Infantry Regiment, were killed in the town of Kommerscheidt when a German tank fired point-blank on their position.

In 2008, a German explosive ordnance disposal team, working at a construction site in the town of Kommerscheidt, found fragments of a World War II-era U.S. military boot. The team notified the German War Graves Commission who recovered remains of two individuals at the site and military equipment including two identification tags.  The items were turned over to a Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command team in the area for further analysis.

Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from the JPAC used dental comparisons in the identification of the remains.

For additional information on the Defense Department‘s mission to account for missing Americans, call 703-699-1420 or visit the DPMO Web site at www.dtic.mil/dpmo .


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The Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of two servicemen, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and are being returned to their families for burial with full military honors.

Navy Lt. Francis B. McIntyre of Mitchell, S.D., will be buried on Sept. 29, and Aviation Radioman Second Class William L. Russell of Cherokee, Okla., will be buried on Oct. 1. Both men will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

On Nov. 10, 1943, the two men took off on a bombing and strafing mission in their SBD-5 Dauntless dive bomber from Munda Field, New Georgia, in the Solomon Islands.  Witnesses last saw the aircraft flying at low altitude through a large explosion on an enemy airfield on Buka Island, Papua New Guinea.  None reported seeing the crash of the aircraft itself.

The American Graves Registration Service searched numerous South Pacific Islands in 1949 in an effort to gather data about aircraft crashes or missing Americans.  The team was unable to find any useful information, and failed to recover any American remains in the area.  A board of review declared both men unrecoverable.

In 2007, a Papuan national found a World War II crash site near the Buka airport, which was reported to U.S. officials.  In May 2008, specialists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC), working with the country’s national museum, investigated the crash site but were unable to excavate it because of inclement weather.  Local officials turned over human remains, McIntyre’s identification tag and other military-related items which had been recovered earlier.  After examining the remains in 2008 and 2009, JPAC determined that no excavation would be required since the two sets of remains were nearly complete.

Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from JPAC used dental comparisons for both men and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA which matched a sample from Russell’s relatives and DNA extracted from a hat belonging to McIntyre.

At the end of World War II, the U.S. government was unable to recover, identify and bury approximately 79,000 individuals. Today, more than 72,000 Americans remain unaccounted-for from the conflict.

For additional information on the Defense Department‘s mission to account for missing Americans, call 703-699-1420 or visit the DPMO Web site at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo .

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The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of two servicemen, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and are being returned to their families for burial with full military honors.

Army Pfc. Lawrence N. Harris, of Elkins, W.V., will be buried on Oct. 8 in Clarksburg, W.V, and Army Cpl. Judge C. Hellums, of Paris, Miss., will be buried on Oct. 9 in Randolph, Miss.  In late September 1944, their unit, the 773rd Tank Battalion, was clearing German forces out of the Parroy Forest near Lunéville.  On Oct. 9, 1944, in the final battle for control of the region, Hellums, Harris and three other soldiers were attacked by enemy fire in their M-10 Tank Destroyer. Harris and Hellums were reported to have been killed, and evidence at the time indicated the remains of the men had been destroyed in the attack and were neither recovered nor buried near the location.

In November 1946, a French soldier working in the Parroy Forest found debris associated with an M-10 vehicle and human remains, which were turned over to the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC).  The remains were buried as unknowns in the Ardennes American Cemetery in Belgium. A year later, the AGRC returned to the Parroy Forest to conduct interviews and search for additional remains.  Investigators noted at that time that all remains of U.S. soldiers had reportedly been removed and that the soldiers were likely buried elsewhere as unknowns.

In 2003, a French citizen exploring the Parroy Forest discovered human remains and an identification bracelet engraved with Hellums’ name.  The information was eventually sent to the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC).  In April 2006, the man turned over the items to a JPAC team working in Europe.

Historians at DPMO and JPAC continued their research on the burials at the Ardennes Cemetery, and drew a correlation to those unknowns that had been removed from the 1944 battle site.  In early 2008, JPAC disinterred these remains and began their forensic review.

Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from JPAC used dental comparisons for both men and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA, which matched that of each soldier’s relatives in the identification of their remains.

At the end of the war, the U.S. government was unable to recover, identify and bury approximately 79,000 Americans.  Today, more than 72,000 remain unaccounted-for from the conflict.

For additional information on the Defense Department‘s mission to account for missing Americans, call 703-699-1169 or visit the DPMO Web site at www.dtic.mil/dpmo.

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~ Welcome Home ~

Rest easy now and know you are not forgotten.

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Homecoming ~

Author: yankeemom  //  Category: POW/MIA

Airman Missing in Action from WWII Identified

Fri, 06 Aug 2010

The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

He is Sgt. John P. Bonnassiolle, U.S. Army, of Oakland, Calif.  He will be buried Tuesday in San Francisco.

On April 29, 1944, he was aboard a B-24J Liberator with nine other crewmen. They failed to return following a bombing mission over Berlin.  German documents captured after the war established the aircraft had crashed near the town of East Meitze, Germany, north of Hannover.  German forces removed the remains of three crewmen from the site and buried them in a cemetery in Hannover.

In 1946, The U.S. Army’s Graves Registration Command located the remains of the men buried in Hannover and reburied them at the U.S. Military Cemetery at Neuville-en-Condroz, Belgium, after confirming the identities of two of the three.

In 2003, a German citizen began excavating the East Meitze crash site and turned over human remains to U.S. officials.  A Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command team traveled to excavate the crash site in 2005 and 2007, recovering additional remains and crew-related equipment — including identification tags for Bonnassiolle and three other crew members.

Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from JPAC and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA — which matched that of Bonnassiolle’s sister — in the identification of his remains.

More than 400,000 of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II died.  At the end of the war, the U.S. government was unable to recover, identify and bury approximately 79,000 as known persons. Today, more than 72,000 Americans remain unaccounted-for from the conflict.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO Web site at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1169.

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Rest Easy, Sgt Bonnassiolle

You’re finally Home

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U.S. Soldier MIA from Korean War Identified

The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing in action from the Korean War, have been identified and returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

United States Army Sgt. Charles P. Whitler will be buried Sept. 2 in his hometown of Cloverport, Ky.

In early November 1950, Whitler was assigned to 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, occupying a defensive position near the town of Unsan by the Kuryong River known as the “Camel’s Head.”  Two enemy elements attacked the U.S. forces, collapsing their perimeter and forcing a withdrawal.  Whitler’s unit was involved in fighting which devolved into hand-to-hand combat around the 3rd Battalion’s command post.  Almost 400 men were reported missing or killed in action following the battle.

In late November 1950, a U.S. soldier captured during the battle of Unsan reported during his debriefing that he and nine American soldiers were moved to a house near the battlefield.  The POWs were taken to an adjacent field and shot. Three of the 10 Americans survived, though one later died.  The surviving solider provided detailed information on the incident location.

Analysts from DPMO developed case leads with information spanning more than 58 years.  Through interviews with eyewitnesses, experts evaluated circumstances surrounding Whitler’s captivity and death and researched wartime documentation of his loss.

In May 2004, a joint U.S.-North Korean team, led by the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, excavated a mass grave near the “Camel’s Head.”  An elderly North Korean man reported he had witnessed the death of seven or eight U.S. soldiers near that location and provided the team with a general description of the burial site.

The excavation team recovered human remains and other personal artifacts, ultimately leading to the identification of seven soldiers from that site, one of whom was Whitler.

Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from JPAC and Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory also used dental comparisons and mitochondrial DNA – which matched that of Whitler’s sister and niece – in the identification.

More than 2,000 servicemen died as prisoners of war during the Korean War.  With this accounting, 8,022 service members still remain missing from the conflict.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO Web site at www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1420.

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You’re free forever now, Sgt. Whitler

Welcome Home



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Finally Home ~

Author: yankeemom  //  Category: POW/MIA

Soldier Missing from Korean War Identified

The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing in action from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

He is Cpl. Roy Stewart, U.S. Army, of Jackson, Miss.  His funeral will be held Tuesday at Arlington National Cemetery near Washington, D.C.  Representatives from the Army’s mortuary office met with the next-of-kin of Stewart to explain the recovery and identification process and to coordinate interment with military honors on behalf of the secretary of the Army.

Stewart was assigned to Company A, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, deployed to North Korea near Kujang-dong.  In late November 1950, he was captured by enemy forces and reportedly died March 14, 1951, while in captivity near Pyoktong, North Korea.

During Operation Glory in the fall of 1954, North Korea turned over 4,167 caskets including remains they claimed to be those of Stewart.  This was part of an agreement in which each side would return remains of enemy soldiers.  The United States returned caskets containing the remains of more than 12,000 communist soldiers.  At the time the Army was unable to identify Stewart and the remains were buried as “unknown” along with 415 other servicemembers.

In 2008, an analyst from DPMO and an independent researcher concluded they had evidence that supported identification of several unknown soldiers buried at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu.  The remains were exhumed in September 2008.  Scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command identified Stewart’s remains through dental comparisons and circumstantial evidence related to the 1954 turnovers.

More than 2,000 servicemen died as prisoners of war during the Korean War.  With the accounting of Stewart, 8,023 servicemembers still remain missing from that conflict.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO Web site at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1420.

Welcome Home, Cpl

Rest Easy Now

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Soldiers Missing in Action from Vietnam War Identified

The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of two U.S. servicemen, missing in action from the Vietnam War, have been identified and will be returned to their families for burial with full military honors.

U.S. Army 1st Lt. Paul G. Magers of Sidney, Neb., will be buried on Aug. 27 in Laurel, Mont., and Army Chief Warrant Officer Donald L. Wann of Shawnee, Okla., will be buried on Aug. 21 in Fort Gibson, Okla.

On June 1, 1971, both men were flying aboard an AH-1 Cobra gunship in support of an emergency extraction of an Army ranger team in Quang Tri Province, South Vietnam.  After the rangers were extracted, helicopters were ordered to destroy claymore mines which had been left behind in the landing zone.  During this mission their helicopter was hit by ground fire, crashed and exploded.  Pilots who witnessed the explosions concluded that no one could have survived the crash and explosions.  Enemy activity in the area precluded a ground search.

In 1990, analysts from DPMO, the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) and their predecessor organizations interviewed both American and Vietnamese witnesses and produced leads for field investigations. In 1993 and 1998, two U.S.-Socialist Republic of Vietnam teams, led by JPAC, surveyed the suspected crash site and found artifacts and debris consistent with a Cobra gunship.  In mid-1999, another joint team excavated the site, but it stopped for safety reasons when the weather deteriorated.  No remains were recovered, but the team did find wreckage associated with the specific crash they were investigating.

The Vietnamese government subsequently declared the region within Quang Tri Province where the aircraft crashed as off-limits to U.S. personnel, citing national security concerns. As part of an agreement with JPAC, a Vietnamese team unilaterally excavated the site and recovered human remains and other artifacts in 2008.  The Vietnamese returned to the site in 2009, expanded the excavation area and discovered more remains and additional evidence.

Forensic analysis, circumstantial evidence and the mitochondrial DNA match to the Magers and Wann families by the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory confirmed the identification of the remains.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO Web site at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1169.

Welcome Home, Rangers

Your missions are done, Fly high

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New Ranger Up Shirt ~

Author: yankeemom  //  Category: POW/MIA

This one is really special!

And this says it all:

American servicemen and servicewomen make a solemn oath when they put on the uniform – an oath than no one will be left behind. We look each other in the eyes and say, “I will bring you back to U.S. soil, no matter what. I will risk life and limb for you, because you are my brothers and sisters in arms and there is nothing more important than that bond.”

This maxim plays out in the battlefields of Iraq and Afghanistan today as it did in every war that our nation has participated in. It lives in our Soldiers’ Creed, in the Ranger Creed, and in our hearts, though few Americans are aware of what acts of bravery occur on a daily basis that make it a reality. Sometimes, they get a flavor for it, when great men like MSG Gary Gordon or SFC Randall Shughart give their lives to uphold it, and Hollywood deems their accomplishment worthy enough to canonize.

Unfortunately, our government doesn’t share this bond, and men are left behind.

Our Vietnam veterans have fought this reality for years, but many in their generation were comfortable with sweeping that war under the table – with forgetting it and moving on. We don’t find this acceptable and it is time for the next generation of veterans and patriots to take up the fight.

That feeling was our inspiration for this shirt. We have modified the classic Vietnam era image of the POW looking down, left behind, with that same POW looking up to see a rescue mission finally arriving – for our country to finally make that promise a reality. The back of the shirt quite simply states, ”Bring them Home, or Send us Back.”

I dare you to find a troop not willing to go on that mission.

A portion of the proceeds of this shirt will be donated to the National League of Families to continue the fight to bring all of our POW/MIA home.

PREORDER (with discount) POW/MIA Send Us Back T-Shirt

Be sure to check out the rest of their shirts, etc.  The guys have been very busy lately and the latest results are exceptional.

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